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Talking to ARM in Sheffield about SPRITE and the UK Trout in The Town project



Richard Paterson from ARM and SPRITE doing his best Phantom of the Opera impression (left)


I was delighted to meet with and give a talk to the folks at ARM in Sheffield yesterday (thank you for the invite and hosting Lotte Aweimrin). Richard Paterson of ARM also happens to be doing a fantastic voluntary job of collaboratively running SPRITE (the Sheffield "Trout in The Town" affiliated chapter) with other committee members in what passes for his "spare" time too.

ARM are responsible for lots of the electronic magic that happens inside your tablets, phones and other electronic devices - they are also taking an active role in providing charitable support to organisations doing good works. You can see more detail on this aspect of their business on their Corporate Responsibility pages.

I wanted to thank all of the ARM staff for listening to my presentation and also the excellent questions afterwards. SPRITE will ensure that your support is put to great use on the rivers in and around Sheffield.

Comments

Nigel Johnstone said…
Fantastic work for the renewal of the Brown Trout in urban areas. It makes me want to go and catch one ! But the wild fish are far clever than I and have eluded me for years :-(
Regards
Nigel Johnstone
Vale of Belvoir

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